Session List

Rekindle the Flame – Renewing Purpose and Passion in Work

Presenter: Denise Bissonnette

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 8:30am - 10:00am

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

Designed to re-ignite the power, passion and purpose which originally drew people to their work, this keynote presentation intertwines poetry, parables, and practical applications to put soul back into the everyday realities of life on the job.  With warmth, humility and humor, Denise delivers ideas and insights from the world’s great wisdom traditions in a way that is easy to understand, process, and apply to the 21st century workplace.  Based on ten key lines of inquiry drawn from her book The Wholehearted Journey, Denise offers her audience a unique opportunity to view work in general, and their jobs in particular, in a fresh light.  Through a variety of engaging exercises, attendees will gain clarity and awareness of their values, motives and purposes, reframe challenges as teachers, and redefine their wealth. It is said that the coal that has been an ember is easily kindled.  This keynote provides the gentle but deliberate breath to rekindle the fire that originally brought people to the important work they are doing.

Learning Objectives:

  • To identify the unique gifts and assets they bring to their work;
  • To gain fresh perspective on challenges by reframing them as gifts, lessons, and teachers;
  • To identify the purpose(s) that drew them to the work they do, and consider how they are called to new purposes each day;
  • To gain clarity and awareness of the values that inform and animate their work;
  • To redefine “wealth” by identifying the many ways in which they are very rich; and,
  • To examine how to attain a greater balance in their lives in and outside of work.

Social Emotional Engagement: The “Fuel for Learning” in the Classroom Setting

Presenter: Emily Rubin, MS, CCC-SLP

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 8:30am - 10:00am

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

Research in the neuroscience of social emotional engagement fosters our ability to create a universal design for learning in our classrooms.  When school communities gain knowledge of a social and emotional scope and sequence of skills and how to facilitate student growth in these domains, we create a positive school climate that is focused on the success of every student. The Social Emotional Engagement – Knowledge and Skills (SEE-KS) program is focused on ensuring that learning environments address the needs of students with autism as well as a range of diverse learners by fostering student engagement, presenting information in multiple ways, and promoting student participation.

Learning Objectives:

  • As a result of this activity, participants will be able identify two implications of social neuroscience that impact how to design lesson plans to foster student engagement.
  • As a result of this activity, participants will be able to identify three essential instructional domains of social emotional engagement that contribute to a positive learning environment.

Mental Health & Thriving in People with ASD

Presenter: Jonathan Weiss, PhD

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 9:15am - 12:00pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

Thriving is an important but almost unused term when we think of treatment and care in the ASD field, which is largely focused on problem behaviours and addressing deficits. This presentation focusses on a framework to promote positive outcomes in youth with ASD, by focusing on theories of positive youth development and resilience.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn about underlying bio-psychosocial risk factors for mental health problems in people with ASD

2. Approach the notion of mental health through a framework of thriving and positive youth development

3. Identify programs and resources that promote mental health across the life course and the spectrum

 

Teaching Safety Skills to Individuals with Autism

Presenter: Bridget A. Taylor, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 9:15am - 12:00pm

Room: 104AB

(2.5  BACB CEUs)

Description:

Individuals with autism present with unique challenges that make them at risk for a wide range of safety concerns. They may, for example, wander from caregivers, be unable to seek assistance when lost and may not know how to respond to unwanted advances by strangers in the community.  This presentation will provide proactive, practical strategies and resources, and applied research directives to help ensure the safety of individuals with autism.

Learning objectives:

1. Identify why individuals with autism are at a risk for safety concerns.

2. Identify current applied research directives to address safety concerns.

3. Identify skills to teach to address safety skills of individuals with autism.

4. Identify current technology that can enhance safety of individuals with autism. 

 

Shifting the Paradigm: A Respectful Approach to Meaningful Behaviour Change

Presenter: Lee Stickle

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 9:15am - 12:00pm

Room: 104CD

Description:

In the past decades, a mass of data has been collected that indicates while significant efforts to increase socially appropriate behavior in people with Autism and related disorders, our ability to sustain that meaningful change has been limited. This presentation will provide a brief look at some of the longitudinal studies that illuminate the elements of effective behavior change. The presentation will propose shift in our approach and will illustrate how taking a different perspective entirely changes the intervention package that is developed and the sustainability of desired outcomes. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Be able to identify the necessary components of behavior intervention packages.
  • Understand the necessity of each of the elements effective behavior intervention packages.
  • Be able to use the tool provided to guide conversations around the process of functional behavior development.
  • Identify the role of the provider (parent, teacher, related services) in the manifestation of behavior.

Emotion Regulation Interventions for Youth/Teens with ASD

Presenter: Jonathan Weiss, PhD

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 1:00pm - 4:15pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

Individuals with ASD often struggle with managing anxiety, anger, or depression, and increasingly, cognitive behaviour (CBT) and mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) is being used to help address these difficulties.  This workshop will review the evidence base that supports the use of CBT and MBT for individuals with ASD, and presents a novel 10-session manualized intervention that focuses on improving emotion regulation skills in 8- to 12-year-olds with ASD and at least average intellectual functioning.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about transdiagnostic case conceptualization of emotion regulation
  2. Learn about the principles of CBT and MBT that can address emotion regulation impairments, including how to incorporate these activities into clinical practice.
  3. Develop ideas in how to adapt traditional CBT and MBT activities to best suit the needs of clients with ASD.

Breakin’ The Law!: Ways to Increase Compliance with Rules and Expectations

Presenter: Merrill Winston, Ph.D., BCBA-D

(2.5  BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 1:00pm - 4:15pm

Room: 104AB

Description:

Clinicians, teachers, parents and direct care staff working with individuals with special needs often rely on rules to control the behavior of individuals with good verbal skills. All too often, however, these rules fail to control behavior. Either they fail to stop inappropriate behavior or fail to produce behaviors targeted for acquisition/increase. This presentation will primarily look at three factors in the determination of whether or not rules will have an impact on behavior. There will be a discussion of the role of rule knowledge, the skills necessary to comply with the rule, and the motivation for rule following (as well as the motivation for rule violation). Time will also be spent discussing the importance of the contingencies that support rule following as well as the actual construction of the rule.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify 3 areas that directly affect rule following: knowledge, skills and motivation
  • Understand the difference between proscriptive and prescriptive rules
  • Learn how to take proscriptive and reformulate them as prescriptive rules
  • Understand several variables that also affect rule following including meaningful consequences for following or violating rules and whether or not the rule contains a replacement behavior for behaviors that cause rule violation

Couples Panel - Between You and Me: Autism and Relationships

Moderator: Stephen Shore, Ph.D.

Presenter: Martine Stonehouse, John Gelmon, Lindsey Nebeker, B.A., David Hamrick

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Room: 104CD

Description:

Dispelling the myth that individuals with autism eschew social interaction, this panel helps validate research suggesting people on the autism spectrum have the same wants, needs, desires, and diversity in relationships as the general population.  The Couples Panel will focus on the challenges, triumphs, insights, and hope in their journeys to and in their togetherness. Through personal experiences, participants will develop a greater understanding of having intimate relations, and ultimately deeper insights on what it means to be human.

Participants shall...

1. List at least two similarities between couples on the autism spectrum and those who are not.

2. Gain familiarity with the challenges facing people on the autism spectrum desiring intimate relationships along with possible solutions.

3. Learn some significant factors that can help bring people together who are on the autism spectrum.

 

Choosing Higher Education …& Staying There

Presenter: Stephen Shore, Ph.D.

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 30 2016 3:00pm - 4:15pm

Room: 104CD

Description:

With today’s greater awareness, research, and interventions, ever-increasing numbers of people with autism are entering higher education.  Many of the common challenges encountered by college students on the autism spectrum transitioning from high school and home into a college environment will be explored.  Some areas of discussion include obtaining academic accommodations and strategies, legal issues, residential and housing considerations, as well as developing self-advocacy skills while the student is still in grade school.  

Learning Objective:

Participants will learn practical solutions for supporting young adults on the autism spectrum to succeed in higher education.

 

Practical Issues with Medication Management

Presenter: Evdokia Anagnostou, MD

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: 101

Description:

This session will review what we know and do not know about medication use for the treatment of symptoms associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder in children and youth.  Cases will be used to demonstrate the use of current algorithms and monitoring guidelines.

Undaunted We Pressed On: Navigating the Spectrum with A Sense of Humour

Presenter: Michael McCreary

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: 104AB

Description:

When Michael’s non-verbal younger brother was diagnosed with autism his parents were asked what traits they possessed that would help them to deal with life with two out of three kids on the spectrum. “A sense of humour,” they chorused. And so it began. This session will be an hour of edu-tainment as Michael – and his father, Doug – find the funny in everything from sleepless nights to “Aspie Dating Tips”, with stops at parent-teen interactions and family outings along the way. Michael’s aim is to use humour to start conversations about ASD, thereby raising awareness and acceptance.

Learning Objective:

We want you to come away from this session knowing that sometimes it is ok to laugh.

 

 

Problem Behaviour is Predictable & Preventable

Presenter: Timothy Vollmer, Ph.D., BCBA-D

(1.5  BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm 

Room: 105

Description:

For many years, some forms of behavior displayed by individuals with autism and related disabilities were considered mysterious and unpredictable. Examples include behavior such as self-injury, severe aggression, property destruction, and tantrums. However, in recent decades, scientific research has shown that in most cases the occurrence of such problem behavior is in fact quite predictable. When behavior is predictable, it is also preventable. This presentation will address how predictability of problem behavior can lead to immediate short-term solutions in the case of dangerous behavior that must be stopped immediately and how. Longer-term solutions to replace problem behavior with appropriate alternative behavior through the use of reinforcement procedures will also be discussed. This presentation will use examples based on Tim Vollmer’s research in the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Be able to specify at least one condition under which a functional analysis helps to predict circumstances under which problem behavior will and will not occur.
  2. Be able to specify at least one method to “turn off” at least some dangerous behavior without the use of punishment, restraint, or medication.
  3. Be able to specify at least dimensions of reinforcement that must be considered when implementing differential reinforcement as a behavioral intervention. 

Promoting Resilience Throughout the Life Span in ASD

Presenter: Peter Szatmari, MD. MSc, FRCPS

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: 104CD 

Description:

Resilience usually refers to a ‘better than expected outcome’ in the context of some adverse event such as child abuse, poverty, parental separation etc. The term has not been used in the context of ASD but there is no logical reason why it could not. Only in this circumstance, the adverse event is the set of risk genes associated with ASD. This presentation will talk about some of the known factors associated with resilience in ASD. This could include genetic factors, cognitive factors, treatment, and accommodation by certain environments (such as school). This session will look at the literature on ‘optimal outcomes’ published by the Fein et al group, as well as Peter Szatmari’s own work from the Pathways in ASD study. A focus on resilience is useful not only for the children with ASD how have a ‘better than expected outcome’ but for all children with ASD.

Physician Session

Moderator: Evdokia Anagnostou, MD

Panelist: Kristin Sohl, M.D., Liz Grier, M.D., Wendy Roberts, M.D., Marjory Phillips, C.Psych., Jessica Brian, PhD., C. Psych., Kevin Stoddart, Ph.D., Jonathan Weiss, PhD.,

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 1:30pm - 5:00pm

Room: 101

Description:

The session will discuss updates in the care of individuals with ASD across the life span.  In particular the session will highlight updates on early diagnosis and early intervention, management of common comorbid medical and learning issues in school aged children, approach to mental health in adolescents, and hot topics in adults with ASD.

Decoding Dating: An Exploration of Dating and Relationships for Individuals with Autism

Presenter: John Miller

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Room: 105

Description:

John Miller examines the different elements involved in dating and relationships for individuals with autism, based on his experiences and book.  His presentation will explorer many important topics, like dating readiness, flirting, hygiene, how to have a successful relationship and what to avoid.  During his presentation John creates a proactive and interactive environment that allows people to actively participate.  It is an honest and forward look at what one needs to do to enter the dating arena and have healthy relationships. His goal is for people to be better informed and widen the horizons of their social lives.

Top Ten Mistakes within Programming for Children with ASD

Presenter: Joanne Gerenser, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

More than 30% of children with autism continue to demonstrate limited functional speech.  Many more will have challenges with receptive and expressive language, as well as a restricted range of social communication. In order to maximize their instructional time and avoid common mistakes, it is important to understand the scientific information available from different disciplines including applied behavior analysis, psycholinguistics and cognitive psychology. This workshop will discuss the top 10 mistakes often made when working with children with ASDs, provide rationales for these problems and offer potential solutions.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe core speech and language deficits present in individuals with ASD
  2. Discuss at least 3 recent key findings in the autism research literature that relate to best practice today
  3. Identify at least 3 common mistakes made by therapists when working with children with an ASD and describe the reasons for these mistakes
  4. Discuss at least 3 possible strategies-solutions to avoid these common mistakes

Personalizing Health Care for Kids with ASD in Hospital Settings

Presenters: Michelle A. Peralta, RN MN BScN BHSc Hon, Arlette Lefebvre MD, FRCP(c). Dip Child Psych, Barbara Muskat PhD, RSW

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Room: 104AB

Description:

When children/youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), developmental delay or with mental illness such as an anxiety disorder (i.e. OCD) come to the hospital, they face a number of challenges including communication, sensory processing, challenges working with health care teams, waiting/transitioning and inflexibility. Often their reactions to hospital visits and interventions can manifest itself through challenging behaviours and treatment refusal which increase the likelihood of the child experiencing psychological trauma/traumatic stress from medical procedures and negatively impact staff's ability to safely deliver health care. Early identification of a patient’s emotional, developmental or behavioural needs and preplanning to customize care does positively affect how health care providers can provide care to the patient and the family as they move through the hospital system.  Because we provide clinicians the tools they need to care for children with ASD, the child and family end up with a more positive experience of the hospital stay.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Enhance knowledge about the developmental, behavioural & sensory needs of pediatric patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) that may arise in health care encounters
  2. Gain knowledge of practice and process changes that have been developed to enhance patients' with ASD and their family’s experiences
  3. Learn about innovative approaches to deliver personalized health care to these children

Ethics of Crisis Management

Presenter: Merrill Winston, Ph.D., BCBA-D

(1.5  BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Room: 104CD

Description:

There are numerous ethical issues that arise in the use of restraint that go well beyond whether or not they should be used with persons with special needs. This presentation will address the concept of ethics in general as a subset of “right and wrong” and will also examine the ethics of restraint reduction goals (as opposed to behavioral improvement), the right to effective treatment, the availability of client choice during restraint and medical clearance before restraint is attempted. There will also be a discussion of the ethics involved in continued restraint in the face of a lack of treatment as well as the practice of accepting individuals that a program simply cannot adequately serve. Other topics will include failure to use restraint when warranted, and the potential violation of civil rights when restraint use is not warranted.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how ethics is another variation of right and wrong
  2. Understand that ethics lies on a continuum of concepts of right and wrong 
  3. Understanding several ethical issues faced by staff, administrators and behavior analysts
  4. Understanding the ethical dilemma of restraint reduction goals and how the May conflict with meaningful treatment 
  5. Understanding the ethics of a failure to restrain when it is necessary

Canadian Autism Partnership (CAP)

Presenter: Margaret Whelan

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Room: 104AB

Description:

Understanding the project and how the partnership model is designed to mobilize research, best practice, policy and stakeholders across disciplines and sectors to address some of the most complex issues the Canadian autism community is facing today.

Employment Panel - Making it Work: Inclusion in the Workplace

Moderator: Denise Bissonnette
Matt Cottle, David Barber, John Miller, Sam Forbes

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

When we think of our life goals, employment often tops the list as a necessity and as a meaningful daily activity where on average most Canadians spend approximately 40 hours a week.  Many individuals with an autism spectrum disorder often do not have the opportunity to experience this aspect of life because of the challenges they face when seeking employment.  Join us for the “Employment Panel - Making it Work: Inclusion in the Workplace” to hear about first-hand accounts from individuals who have faced employment-related challenges and how they have overcome them.  Sign-up for this session to learn about how you can help create a supportive work environment for individuals on the spectrum and increase meaningful employment for them.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding the challenges faced by individuals with an ASD when seeking employment
  • Understanding the support and accommodations required for individuals with an ASD in the workplace
  • Understanding that everyone, including individuals with an ASD have goals that are employment-related
  • Understanding that together, with the right supports individuals with an ASD can be meaningfully employed

 

Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) in Young Children with ASD: Advancements in the Field

Presenter: Daniel Openden, Ph.D., BCBA-D

(1.5  BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Room: 105

Description:

Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) is an evidence-based model for children with ASDs based on the science of applied behavior analysis (ABA).  PRT has been described in the literature as a family-centered approach that may be implemented throughout the day and across natural environments, such as in the home, at school, or in the community.  Dr. Openden will delineate the development of PRT and the implementation of procedures for improving the pivotal response of motivation to produce generalized improvements in language, social, and academic skills as well as reductions in disruptive behaviors.  Video examples will be used to illustrate how parents and professionals can implement the motivational procedures of PRT throughout the day and across settings.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to understand pivotal responses as they relate to core areas of intervention and widespread improvements in young children with ASDs.
  2. Participants will be able to understand how to use natural reinforcers for improving motivation and for improving generalization for young children with ASDs.
  3. Participants will be able to understand how to use the motivational procedures of PRT to improve social communication in young children with ASDs.

Parents on the Fault-line: Co-Parental Conflict, Family Breakdown and Implications for Children with ASDs

Presenter: Rae Morris, Michael A. Saini, Ph.D., Kevin Stoddart, Ph.D.

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

Over the past few decades of family research, there has been growing attention on the impact of rearing a child with ASD, but information about navigating and maintaining positive co-parenting relationships is sparse. This presentation will provide an overview of recent research exploring the challenges and opportunities for parents of children and youth with ASD, and the trends in family law for these families. Based on this and clinical experience key themes that significantly impact the quality of, and satisfaction with, the co-parenting relationship, as well as strategies and recommendations for families and professionals will be addressed.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To learn about challenges to the co-parenting relationship faced by parents of children with ASD
  2. To learn about factors that can impact the quality of, and satisfaction with, the co-parenting relationship between parents of children with ASD
  3. To learn about the impact of co-parenting relationship on children with ASD
  4. To learn tips and strategies for working with parents and families to optimize positive relationships

Hidden Curriculum: Practical Solutions for Understanding Rules in Social Situations

Presenter: Brenda Smith Myles, Ph.D.

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: 105

Description:

The Hidden Curriculum refers to the set of rules or guidelines that are often not directly taught but are assumed to be known (Garrett, 1984; Hemmings, 2000; Jackson, 1968; Kanpol, 1989). This curriculum contains items that impact social interactions, school performance, and sometimes health and well-being. The curriculum also includes unspoken rules, slang, metaphors, body language, etc. While this information may be intuitive for neurotypical individuals, it is not for those with autism or other special needs. This session includes practical tips for teaching these hidden social needs to children and to adults and stresses the importance of making these a part of everyday life.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the hidden curriculum
  • Explain the hidden curriculum's applicability to school, community, and home
  • Identify hidden curriculum areas and items across preschool, middle school, high school, and adulthood

The Critical Roles of Teachers, Paraprofessionals & Parents as Behavioural Engineers

Presenter: Andrew Houvouras IV, MA, BCBA

(1.5 BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: 104CD

Description:

Behaviour analysts are not agents of change, merely catalysts. Those most likely to change behaviour are those with daily contact with individuals in the autism spectrum. This presentation focuses on ways to help change agents understand and enhance their roles in fostering meaningful behavior change through the use of positive reinforcement, by understanding functional perspectives and by providing ways for the true engineers of behavior change tools to make their behavior analysts more effective.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to define positive reinforcement
  • Attendees will be able to list 2 potential functions of problem behavior
  • Attendees will be able to describe 3 ways to make their behavior analyst more effective

Working Together: Behaviour Analyst & Occupational Therapist Collaboration

Presenter: Amy Stango, M.S., OTR/L, M.S., BCBA

(1.5 BACB CEUs)

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Description:

This presentation will address how occupational therapy practitioners and behavior analysts can work collaboratively to effectively and efficiently help the children they serve by using evidence-based practices drawn from the empirical literature of both professional fields.  Through a combination of lecture, video examples, and case studies, participants will learn how occupational therapists and behavior analysts can collaborate to teach motor, functional language, play, and self-care skills, as well as how to work together to prevent and manage problem behavior.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will identify potential reinforcers maintaining sensory behaviors.
  2. Participants will describe how to use escape extinction hierarchies to increase compliance with tolerating non-preferred stimuli.
  3. Participants will identify which common treatments for sensory behaviors lack empirical evidence.
  4. Participants will describe evidence-based strategies for changing behaviors that are under the control of automatic reinforcement.

Why Genomics is Important in Autism Research

Presenter: Stephen Scherer, PhD, DSc, FRSC

Date/Time: Friday, December 2 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Room: 105

Description:

Twenty years ago Autism Spectrum Disorder was an enigma, with very little known about it. Autism, previously thought to be strictly a behavioural disorder, can have a biological basis and that specific genes can be involved. In fact, dozens of genes have now been identified as susceptibility factors involved in autism. Some specific ASD-causing genes are now used in diagnostic testing. Combined, these genes account for approximately 20% of individuals with autism, and they make proteins that control how brain cells communicate with each other. With the astounding technical breakthroughs that are now starting to enable complete human genome sequencing, which decodes all 3 billion genetic letters in the DNA blueprint in a single experiment, we expect that we'll soon find even more ASD risk genes. Steve Scherer is the lead for the monumental international project:  MSSNG (finding the missing information in autism) It is the world's largest genomic database for autism research. MSSNG's goal is to provide the best resource for researchers around the world to enable the identification of many subtypes of autism, which will lead to better diagnostics and new medicines.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide the most recent update in advances in the understanding of the genetic factors involved in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD);
  2. To explain how this new genetic information may be useful to enable early identification of ASD;
  3. To discuss the importance of the massive Autism Speaks-Google-SickKids led MSSNG whole genome sequencing project;
  4. To discuss how the development of new diagnostics, medicines and clinical trials will be empowered through genome research.

 Interoception, The 8th Sensory System: Practical Considerations and Strategies for Improving Self-Regulation and Social Cognition

Presenter: Kelly Mahler

Date/Time: Thursday, December 1 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm

Room: John Bassett Theatre

Abstract:

Interoception is an extremely important sensory system that helps us to ‘feel’ the internal states of our body like hunger, thirst, needing the bathroom, pain, sexual arousal, heart rate and muscle tension. Additionally, research indicates that interoception is closely tied to our emotional experience. This presentation will provide an overview of what research tells us about interoception, and how to apply this research when developing programming for individuals with autism. Discussion will focus on the link between interoception and many important skill areas including self-regulation and social cognition. Several practical strategies for assessing and improving interoception will be shared.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the eighth sensory system called Interoception
  2. Name 3 skill areas that are impacted by Interoception
  3. Name 2 strategies used to build Interoceptive Awareness

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  +1 (416)-322-7877 x 516
  symposium@autism.net

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